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Infinity Hall

A Review and Guide to Connecticut's Newest and Oldest Entertainment Venue

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Infinity Hall Norfolk CT Photo

Infinity Hall in Norfolk, Connecticut, has been heating up the Connecticut music scene since it opened its doors at the tail end of 2008.

© 2009 Kim Knox Beckius
Infinity Hall--Connecticut's newest and oldest music hall--opened its bright green, red and gold doors in October of 2008, and it hasn't taken long for music lovers to discover this stunningly renovated, acoustically superb, 300-seat theater.

Infinity Hall is transforming the "ice box of Connecticut" into the state's hottest little town. Concert-goers are flocking from as far as Maine to this intimate live music venue in Norfolk, a sleepy outpost in the western Connecticut hills that owes its frigid reputation to its 1,770-foot elevation: the highest in the state.

Find Nearby Hotels | See More Infinity Hall Photos

It's Like Seeing a Concert in Your Living Room

My husband and I had seats in the fourth row for Poco at Infinity Hall on February 28, 2009, and the vibe was so intimate, it felt as though this country rock band that charted with songs like Crazy Love and In the Heart of the Night was playing a gig in our living room for a small circle of friends. Those seated in the front row could actually put their feet up on stage. And we know from sitting farther back at our first Infinity Hall show, as well as from scoping out the cabaret-style seating in the mezzanine for a future concert, that there isn't a bad view in the house.

Of course, Infinity Hall is infinitely better than my living room. The acoustics are brilliant: a combination of the vaulted hall's design, a state-of-the-art Meyer sound system and Infinity's adept sound crew. Poco opened with an unplugged set but really rocked once they picked up electric guitars, and the balance and volume were perfect throughout.

The ambiance, too, creates a distinctly warm and cozy mood. Inside and out, this architecturally intriguing Victorian opera house, built in 1883, has been thoughtfully and beautifully restored. Stained and polished wood paneling and balustrades gleam, wagon wheel chandeliers bathe the hall in golden light, stained glass windows add a hint of color, and the 125-year-old original proscenium stage sets a stylish backdrop for performances that run the entertainment gamut: Jazz, blues, folk, classical, rock, comedy and children's artists have all been booked since the venue's debut. A schedule of upcoming shows is available at the Infinity Hall Web site.

The Downside of Intimacy

Infinity Hall Mezzanine Photo

The mezzanine or balcony at Infinity Hall offers more spacious, cabaret-style seating and table service. Although the tickets are more expensive than orchestra-level seats, they're worth it for a special evening out.

© 2009 Kim Knox Beckius
Infinity Hall is just a half-hour from my home in Connecticut, and since it opened, I've become the easiest woman on Earth to shop for: The Poco tickets were my Valentine's Day gift, and I know I'll be unwrapping mezzanine seats for Orleans on my birthday. From a quick check of Poco's community forum and conversations we overheard, we know that some "Poconuts" traveled three hours or more to see the show. Infinity Hall is definitely a worthwhile destination and a truly unforgettable place to see a performance, but a venue this intimate has a few downsides, of course.

Orchestra-level seating is so tight that the lack of legroom is uncomfortable for me--at 5'4" tall. Although the very front row has a bit more space, I wouldn't recommend sitting closer than the fourth row unless gazing up into your favorite artist's nostrils is on your bucket list. We incorrectly surmised from viewing the online seating chart, which is displayed during the ticket ordering process, that seats on the far right and left sides of the venue are on an aisle: They are actually right up against the venue's exterior walls. It's impossible to get out of one's seat for a visit to the bar or the bathroom without asking everyone else in your row to vacate their seats and move to the aisle. A place for the claustrophobic, this is not.

At intermission and pre- and post-concert, areas such as the first-floor hallway and the standing-room-only area in the back of the music hall are so crowded, movement is difficult, and I watched one poor cocktail server spill her tray as she tried to navigate the mob.

Navigating Infinity Hall

Infinity Hall has three floors. The first-floor entry level has the venue's only restrooms. A music-themed bistro restaurant and bar opened May 1, 2009. The music hall and a second bar are located up a carpeted staircase on the second floor. While an elevator is available for handicapped concert-goers, its use requires staff assistance. The third-floor mezzanine level offers its own bar and table seating and service: It's a much more spacious area and the best option for patrons who desire or require more comfortable seating room.

More Infinity Hall Tips:

  • Seats 9 and 10 at Table BB on the mezzanine (balcony), are the best seats in the house.
  • Although parking is free, the lot fills up quickly on sold-out show nights, so arrive at least a half-hour before concert time: even earlier if you want to avoid a long walk. The parking lot entrance is on Route 44 just east of Infinity Hall.
  • Infinity's own bistro and outdoor patio opened in May 2009, and the restaurant's menu is available to mezzanine patrons. Mizza's Pizza, an unassuming little Italian place with no bar but terrific bruschetta, is right next door. The neighboring Wood Creek Bar and Grill is also a convenient choice for a pre- or post-show bite, but we weren't impressed with the food or service when we visited.
  • Need tickets for a sold-out Infinity Hall show? The best place to check for after market tickets is the local Craigslist.
  • Don't forget to bundle up! It may be jumping inside Infinity Hall, but the hotter the music, the colder it will feel when you step outside on a crisp Norfolk night.

Infinity and Beyond

Photo of Infinity Hall Stage - Infinity Music Hall Norfolk Connecticut

Originally an opera house and community center when it was built in Japanese-inspired Victorian style in 1883, Infinity Hall is once again becoming the hub of Norfolk, with an eclectic line-up of shows scheduled for two or three nights each week.

© 2009 Kim Knox Beckius
Tickets: Tickets may be purchased online or by calling the Box Office toll free at 866-666-6306. The Box Office is also open for ticket sales during concerts.

Perks: Infinity Stars receive a $25 gift card, free cap, advance sales and more for a $75 annual fee.

Food & Drink: Each of Infinity's three floors has a bar serving coffee, tea, cocktails, specialty drinks and a decent selection of beer and wine by the glass. Food is served on the mezzanine, snacks on the second floor.

Directions: Infinity Hall is located on Route 44 in the center of Norfolk in northwestern Connecticut. It's an hour's drive west of Hartford, an hour and a half from Albany and two and a half hours from New York City. The Infinity Hall Web site has directions and a map to help you find your way.

Hotels: Need to stay overnight? Here's a round-up of hotels and inns near Infinity Music Hall.

More Things To Do in Northwestern Connecticut: Consider extending your stay in the Norfolk area and visiting one of these local attractions:

  • Yale Summer School of Music - Located across the street from Infinity Hall, Yale's Music School offers a series of classical concerts during the Chamber Music Festival each summer.
  • Gilson Cafe~Cinema - Located just 10 miles east of Norfolk in Winsted, Connecticut, this unique entertainment venue is a cross between a second-run movie theater and a restaurant.
  • Litchfield - The historic town of Litchfield, Connecticut, located a half-hour south of Norfolk, is a wonderful destination for sightseeing, shopping, dining, leaf peeping, wine tasting and exploring the great outdoors.

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